Tag Archives: Nikon

Battered…

World © Geoff Wilkinson - All rights reserved

World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

….and I’m not talking about fish. I have a pair of very old cameras, old by digital standards anyway. They are Nikon F80’s dating from around 2001, see what I mean by old. They have gathered a lot of air miles and have had a lot of film put through them. I don’t think this model was ever thought of as ‘professional’ but then again I have rarely used big heavy professional cameras.

The point of this post is that after 14 years both still work perfectly, for anyone starting out and wanting to use film they would be great. Interesting I have been looking on Amazon and secondhand they still fetch between £55 and £125 which surprised me.

The point I wanted to make was that the exterior appearance is still perfect. I have no idea what they make modern camera bodies out of, I expect I could find out with a little research, but this pair of bodies look pristine. When I was a staff photographer on the Daily Mail in the 60’s I had the original Nikon F bodies in black finish. It was amazing how quickly the black finish wore off, got scratched and scuffed in the day to day hurly burly of Fleet Street. Within a few months they looked very sad and battered, mechanically of course they worked perfectly and having a battered Nikon body with brass shining through the black was the height of professionalism, or so I thought at the time.

Have a look at my F80’s at the top of the page and then click here to see Elliott Erwitt’s Leica M3 from the 60’s and you will understand what I am talking about…which finish do you prefer..

As a point of interest you can now buy a brand new Leica, the Leica MP Correspondent designed by the singer and Leica user Lenny Kravitz. It arrives having had ‘an elaborate wearing process completely by hand has carefully rubbed, scuffed and scratched the black enamel finish away in several places on both the camera and lens to let the bright brass surface shine through’ The nostalgia almost brings a tear to my eyes but be prepared to pay $24,500 with lens for this limited edition beauty, you can click here to have a look…ah the price of the good old days…

Tip of the week – getting closer

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

Interesting stuff last weekend. If you follow me on twitter @GeoffWilkinson7, you will know that while the sun was shining outside and people were sunbathing and barbecuing, I was in my little studio crashing out dozens of still life’s. Actually it was quite a challenging project, lots of things to be photographed ranging from very small to about A4 size. With so many to do how to go about it with the minimum of fuss and lighting changes ? Continue reading

Saturday morning in Grasse…

PLACE AUX AIRES, GRASSE, FRANCE

World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

This is the sort of picture that I really like, it’s simple, with interesting subject matter in the camera’s frame against a suitable backdrop and I just happened across it. It was taken one Saturday morning outside a bric-a-brac shop on the Place des Huguenots In Grasse, France. Continue reading

New Nikon…

D4s

© Nikon UK

Nikon D4s announced today. In the shops from 6th March 2014, check out all the spec’s here at Nikon UK. At a shade over £5000, it’ll be interesting to see what users think as and when it becomes generally available. Having had a chance to have a brief look at the specs, particularly the video aspect, I think this will give the Canon 1DX a run for it’s money.

Tip for the week: Now zoom in…

Tip for the week: Now zoom in.. 

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

… and I’m not talking about the camera lens either. I suspect one of the most neglected features and least known features of modern digital cameras is the zoom tool. As I said it’s not the zoom on the lens but rather at the other end of the camera, the back bit where the screen is. I have seen people squinting or holding the camera just a couple of inches from their nose trying to see the detail in the image on the screen. It’s not always easy to look at a picture on a screen that may be just 3 inches across, and much less than that on an older digital camera. It’s easy to spot detail on a 15 or 27 inch computer screen, you can easily spot the half hidden car in your beautiful landscape or a blemish on your subjects nose if your prefer portraiture.

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

So what to do ? Chances are unless you have an older digital camera that lacks a zoom function on the screen itself, you can actually zoom in on your masterpiece to check the finest detail. The zoom button may vary from camera to camera, for instance on Nikon DSLRs it’s just by the screen marked with a plus sign in a magnifying glass shape logo. On compact models it’s quite often the same function or button you use to zoom the lens.

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

So take a little time to find it and more importantly use it, better to find any hiccups on location rather than later back at home.

Technical info: Nikon D80 handheld in Aperture priority mode, with a Nikon f2.8 60mm Macro lens. The exposure was at 1/60th of a second at f3.3 for the pictures of the screen and 1/25th of a second at f4 for the close up of the button. the ISO was 200 for all pictures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My tip of the week – camera and tripod plates…

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

Following on about tripods here’s one last thing, it’s only a quickie so bear with me. When I first started photography the camera body or telephoto lens screwed directly on to the top of the tripod, seemed fairly simple to me. Now on most tripods you need to screw a plate onto the camera and then the plate ‘clamps’ into a mount on the tripod. Is this a better solution than screwing the camera on directly, I don’t know but it seems the way it is these days.

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

As far as I can see this system has two downsides, the first being that if you don’t clamp the plate securely home in the mount on the tripod your camera can take a tumble. The second is that if you forget to take the plate when you are going on location basically you have a problem, you have no way of attaching the camera to the tripod.

So here’s my solution to both problems. 1. I always make sure the camera strap is around my neck when I fix the camera to the tripod. That way if it is incorrectly fitted and takes a tumble it’s not going to go very far. Maybe just bruise your chest a little! 2. buy spare camera plates and keep one in each of your camera bags in addition to the one on your tripod. I take it one step further. I keep camera plates permanently attached to both my Nikon camera bodies and another on my Nikon f2.8 80/200mm zoom lens, hopefully now I never get caught out, paranoid or what.

 I know what your thinking and your right, I was once caught out!

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World © Geoff Wilkinson – All rights reserved

Technical info: All photographs taken with my Nikon D7000, handheld in Aperture priority mode, the lens was a Nikon 50mm F1.4. The aperture for all pictures was f2.8 and the shutter speed varied between 1/100 of a second and a 1/50th of a second. The ISO was 200

 

 

Mr Selfridge..

I posted this story originally on the 15th September last year quite soon after I started this blog. It’s about the filming of the television drama ‘Mr Selfridge’, I happened across the crew on location near Arnold Circus in East London. As the drama is back on our television screens this weekend for a second series I thought it worth running the post again in case you missed it first time around. Enjoy the story and enjoy the show which is broadcast on Sunday 19th January at 9pm on ITV.

Click on the link Mr Selfridge to see the story: